Wing Chun Kung Fu

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Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 3rd, 2009, 5:40 am

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G'day. :wave (TH)

In 1997 I started my Wing Chun training with Sifu Dave Bennett in a scout hall at Ermington in Sydney. This was (at that point) the western Sydney part of the training academy of Rick Spain, who I also trained under in at the headquarters of the Wing Chun Kung Fu Organisation, Elizabeth Street, Surrey Hills, Sydney.

Initially, I started with the four classes a week at Ermington (Monday & Wednesday evening/night), but moved on to doing seven classes a week when I started classes at Surrey Hills (Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday lunchtime classes). I would also occasionally attend the sparring class held on Saturdays, although we usually sparred during classes at Ermington and I was fortunate to do a lot of light hand sparring with Sihung Nick during and after his preparation for his Gold Sash at Surrey Hills. I invested in a wooden Dummy (Chong), a six foot kick bag, focus pads, kick shield, a staff and sticks. Later, a friend that I trained with gave me some Butterfly Swords.

My training only stopped after I had an incident with a fridge and had damaged my back, although I continued to develop my Chi and pushed myself to train on my own within the limits that my physicality allowed. At this point I also started using Qi Gong/Chi Gung techniques as a healing modality, which also further enhanced my Chi.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Grandmaster Yip Man --> Grandmaster William Cheung --> Rick Spain

William Cheung:
Bruce and I grew up together. We were friends since we were young boys. It was I who introduced Bruce Lee to Wing Chun School in the summer of 1954. In the old days, the master would never teach the new students. It was up to the senior students to pass on the Wing Chun lessons to Bruce. As I was his Kung Fu Senior of many years, I was instructed by Grandmaster Yip man to train him. By 1955, one year into his Wing Chun training, Bruce progressed very fast, and already became a threat to most of the Wing Chun seniors as the majority of them were armchair martial artists. They discovered that Bruce was not a full blooded Chinese because his mother was half German and half Chinese. The seniors got together and put pressure on Professor Yip Man and tried to get Bruce kicked out of the Wing Chun School. Because racism was widely practised in Martial Arts School in Hong Kong, the art was not allowed to be taught to foreigners. Professor Yip Man had no other choice but to bow to their pressure, but he told Bruce that he could train with me and Sihing Wong Shun Leung. But most of the time we trained together.
Continued at ... http://www.cheungswingchun.com/g/1472/t ... ecret.html


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Rick Spain:
Rick Spain was born in New Zealand in 1962. He trained and lived in Victoria inside William Cheung's school. In 1982, Rick competed in the World Invitation Full Contact Kung Fu Championships in Hong Kong. Rick won, and the tourney is unlikely to be held again, as so many people were seriously injured.
http://www.wcarchive.com/html/sifus/win ... ifus-r.htm

Here's a promo video clip of Rick Spain ...



So, considering the influence of the training that I did, I thought that I would start a thread dedicated to Wing Chun Kung Fu, and if anyone is interested, feel free to add to the thread with information, video clips, or if you have any questions, I'll see what I can do in answering them for you.


THANK YOU

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
YOUR BELIEFS WILL IMPRISON YOU.


What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
WHO AM I ? . . . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT ALL IS !!!


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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 3rd, 2009, 5:52 am

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Hand speed ..



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=veRtesXr9Rc

THANK YOU

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
YOUR BELIEFS WILL IMPRISON YOU.


What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
WHO AM I ? . . . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT ALL IS !!!


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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 3rd, 2009, 5:56 am

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Double-arm Chi Sao ...

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Yip Man & Bruce Lee



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ev8DeGyY44c




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaP1X-lEtgc




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiQRlr5NCwk




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnHlLiYmVXA

THANK YOU

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
YOUR BELIEFS WILL IMPRISON YOU.


What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
WHO AM I ? . . . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT ALL IS !!!


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I AM ALL I AM
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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 3rd, 2009, 7:42 am

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Hung Suen Wing Chun History


The Hung Suen Wing Chun Kung Fu system dates back over two hundred years to the Siu Lam Temple. As a result of the political atmosphere of the times, this branch of Hung Suen Wing Chun has never been made public or taught outside its direct lineage. Instead, it was handed down in secrecy from family member to family member.

From 1644 to 1911, the Manchurians ruled China in a period known as the Qing Dynasty. Early in the 1700's, the Manchurians became concerned about the Siu Lam Temples' rebellious activities and their continued development of the fighting arts. Under the decision to eliminate the threat of these rebels and their leaders, the Manchurians attempted to exterminate the Siu Lam monks to prevent them from spreading their martial skills and knowledge. Eventually, both Siu Lam Temples were burnt and destroyed.

According to Hung Suen Wing Chun tradition, prior to the destruction of the temples, a comprehensive advanced martial art system known as Hung Suen Wing Chun was developed. Hung Suen Wing Chun was formulated through generations of Siu Lam knowledge and experience. As with all advanced Siu Lam knowledge, Hung Suen Wing Chun was conducted under a 'silent code'. This meant that in order to prevent abuse, it was passed down to only a few chosen disciples and was never documented.

With such a hidden past, we now rely heavily on the direct teachings of the elders for historical material. As told by teacher to student, two Siu Lam monks escaped the Manchurians' massacres and were able to keep the Hung Suen Wing Chun system alive. One of these monks was the twenty-second generation Siu Lam grandmaster, Yat Chum Dai Si. The other monk was named Cheung Ng. Before his death, grandmaster Yat Chum Dai Si passed on his high level Hung Suen Wing Chun knowledge to Cheung Ng.

In order to keep his identity and Siu Lam background fom the Manchurian government, Cheung Ng joined the Red Boat Opera Troupe. The name was given to this organisation of talented stage performers who travelled in red boats. Accomplished in Kung Fu and gymnastics, they formed their own organisation and stage names: the Red Boat Opera was Cheung Ng's safest refuge.

Cheung Ng became known in the opera troupe as Tan Sao Ng (Spread-Out Arm Ng) from his skilful use of the Hung Suen Wing Chun manoeuvre tan sao to subdue others during challenges. His level of skill allowed him to use one tan sao to represent over one thousand moves. He demonstrated that a basic technique such as tan sao must be fully understood, in concept and application, prior to the next thousand techniques. After learning the next thousand techniques, then they all become one again.

Harsh Manchurian actions created such distrust among the people that they resulted in the formation of underground organisations or secret societies such as the Heaven and Earth Society and the White Lotus Society. Within a secret society, the identity of the leaders, members, and their activities were known only to a few within the society itself.

One of the Red Boat Opera Troupe actors by the name of Hung Gun Biu (Red Bandana Biu), was a secret society leader and brought Tan Sao Ng into the organisation. The safety of the opera troupe combined with the security of the secret society allowed Ng to spread his Hung Suen Wing Chun knowledge in confidence.

As a trusted leader, Hung Gun Biu became one of Ng's closest disciples. However, in order to protect the system's origins and the identities of Yat Chum Dai Si and Tan Sao Ng, a story was created. It was said that a Siu Lam nun named Ng Mui taught the martial arts to a young woman named Yim Wing-Chun. As Yim Wing-Chum taught it to others, the system became known as Wing Chun kung fu. Many versions of the story exist around the world today. However, the name of 'Yim Wing Chun' also has a different and special meaning. 'Yim' can be translated to mean 'protect', 'prohibit' or 'secret'. The term 'Wing Chun' referred to the Siu Lam Wing Chun Tong (Always Spring Hall). Thus, 'Yim Wing Chun' was actually a code, meaning the secret art of the Siu Lam Wing Chun Hall.

Hung Gun Biu became one of the first generation disciples to learn Hung Suen Wing Chun, outside the Siu Lam Temple. The other opera troupe members who learned Hung Suen Wing Chun from 'Tan Sao' Ng also had the obligation to protect the origin of the system. These other first generation disciples included Wong Wah-Bo, Leung Yee-Tai, Dai Fa Min Kam (Painted Face Kam), Lo Man-Gong, Siu-Sang Hung Fook, and Gao Lo Chung (Tall Man Chung). Based on their individual understanding and degree of training in Wing Chun, these disciples, all previously trained in other martial art styles, may have passed along their skills with inherently different emphases.

Hung Gun Biu's lineage became known as Hung Suen Wing Chun (Red Boat) and followed a tradition to pass down the full system only to family members who took the traditional and ceremonial Siu Lam vow of secrecy. The system's lineage shows that Hung Gun Biu taught his relative, Cheung Gung who passed it down to his great nephew, Wang Ting. Wang Ting taught his son, Dr Wang Ming, of Saiquan, China. Dr Wang Ming taught the entire system with its original concepts to only four disciples. (Extract from Complete Wing Chun Robert Chu, Rene Ritchie and Y. Wu 1998).

In 1950, Yip Man started to teach Wing Chun in Hong Kong. One of his first students was chosen to be the sole inheritor of the traditional teachings of Wing Chun, William Cheung Cheuk Hing. In 1982, two of his students won both the Heavyweight and Middleweight divisions of the World Invitation Full Contact Kung Fu Championships in Hong Kong.

The Wing Chun curriculum that you will see taught here will be different to any other Wing Chun curriculum. Our Wing Chun is primarily Hung Suen Wing Chun lineage whereas most other Wing Chun schools can be traced back to Hong Kong, and have varying degrees of purity.

If you would like to do further reading on different Wing Chun lineages taught today, we recommend Complete Wing Chun by R. Chu, R. Ritchie and Y. Wu, Tutle publications. We trust you will enjoy your experience of the true teachings of Wing Chun.

http://www.combatcentres.com/index.php? ... Itemid=126

THANK YOU

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
YOUR BELIEFS WILL IMPRISON YOU.


What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
WHO AM I ? . . . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT ALL IS !!!


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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 3rd, 2009, 7:55 am

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The wooden dummy (chong) ...

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Wooden Dummy – How to Build a Wing Chun Wooden Dummy


Mook Yan Jong – literally translates “wood man post”, but is generally called a “wooden dummy” in English, or “jong” for short. The dummy consists of a body with two upper arms at shoulder level, a lower arm at stomach height, and one leg, suspended on a framework by two crosspieces. As easy at it might looks to make a real wooden dummy is an extremely difficult task. For some this task has an incredible end result, a training partner with your sweat, blood and qi.

Wooden Dummy Materials

Teak was often traditionally used for all parts of the dummy. But, since solid blocks of this exotic hardwood are increasingly hard to find, you can use almost any strong hardwood – one that’s heavy, strong and dense, but not brittle. Some softwoods may not have enough strength to withstand the force applied to a dummy, or have the proper weight. Another problem with softer wood is that over time, as the arms and legs are struck repeatedly, they become compressed and more “sloppy” in their movement.

Because it’s difficult to get hardwood in a piece large enough, you might try laminated wood (although the look will be different with all those lines running through it).

Avoid wood with pitch in it, and the wood should be well seasoned – dry all the way through – to avoid cracking. Try to find wood native to your area since transporting it from a different climate, especially with different humidity, can cause cracking. Even with these precautions wood will still sometimes check or split, in which case you might use a wood fill or banding.


Wooden Dummy Body

Use hardwood for the body so its weight will correspond to that of a human Wooden_dummy_02body. This way if you can move the dummy you can also move a person. The body has a round cross section of about nine inches in diameter. Anything smaller doesn’t give the needed weight and requires adjustments in the length of arms and leg. The height of the body is five feet.

Make the cross section for the wooden dummy as close to a perfect circle as possible. Irregularities in the surface could cause damage to hand, fist or foot.

The body should be smooth, though not necessarily polished, to avoid splinters.

Slightly taper or round off the top and bottom of the body to remove hard edges.

One of the hardest parts of dummy construction is cutting the square holes for the arms. First drill circular holes, then square them with hand chisels. In order to give both arms room to pass through the wooden dummy, the left arm (facing the dummy) is slightly higher than the right. The holes intersect at their outer edges where they cross in the exact center of the dummy. An advantage of hardwood is that you’re less likely to tear up the center of the dummy as you cut these overlapping holes.


Wooden Dummy Arms

The arms should be the same material as the body, since they need as much strength. Stress on the arms is at the point where they enter the body.

Turn the arms on a lathe, rather than make them by hand, since a smooth level surface is essential.

All three arms are identical Each is twenty-two inches long, divided into two sections: one eleven inch half goes through the wooden dummy body and out the back, the other eleven inch half sticks out from in front of the dummy. All three arms are set parallel to the floor.

The visible half of the arm, extending from the dummy, is cylindrical – though wider at the point where it leaves the body and tapering smaller towards the tip. The widest part, closest to the dummy, is two and a half inches in diameter. The amount of taper differs, but a loss of about an inch, down to one and a half inches in diameter at the tip, is average. Slightly round off the tip end so there are no hard edges.

The inner hidden half of the dummy arm has a square cross section. Though it’s far easier to make the inner half cylindrical, this would allow the dummy arm to spin on contact – unlike a real opponent’s arm. This half of the arm can be either in line with the outer half, or offset from center so one corner of the inner half touches one edge of the outer half while the opposite corner of the squared inner half is inset from the edge of the rounded outer half. While this offset is more difficult to make, it allows the wooden dummy arms to be adjusted to different angles simply by switching or turning the arms, causing the width apart at the tapered ends to be changed. While the distance apart at the tips depends on your own body – the upper arms point at your shoulders when you stand at an arms length away from the dummy – the average is about eight and a half inches.

The upper arm is nine inches down from the top of the dummy. The lower arm is eight and a half inches down from the upper arms, extending straight out from the center of the body.

The holes cut in the body for the arms should provide a fairly tight fit, neither too tight or too loose. Your technique on the dummy can be judged by the sound of the arms moving in their holes: a dull thud indicates tension in the arms, caused by holding back power, while a sharp “clack” shows power has been properly passed to the wing chun wooden dummy without force being reabsorbed into your own arm.

Extend the dummy arms through the body and out the back two inches. Secure the arm in place with a removable pin or wedge.


Wooden Dummy Leg

The leg is divided into two sections: one half extending through the dummy and out from the front center of the body to a “knee joint”, the other half extending down towards the “ankle”.

The leg is the least standardized part of the dummy. The upper part of the leg may come straight out from the dummy, parallel with the floor, or it may extend downwards at an angle. The lower part of the leg may come straight down, at a right angle to the floor, or it may extend forward at an angle. It is meant to correspond to your own leg, if you were to stand with one leg forward, so keep this pattern in mind when making your wooden leg. Use the knee joint as your guide and have it roughly at the same height as your own knee.

The upper section of the leg is twenty-two inches long: one half of which extends through the dummy and out the back, the other half extending out in front. The part that passes through the wooden dummy must be smaller than the part that is visible, so the leg won’t slide back up into the dummy. The lower “hanging” section is about thirteen inches long. As with the arms, the leg is secured in back with a removable pin or wedge.

The diameter of the leg is not standardized, since it was traditionally made from a hardwood branch with a knot and bend where the knee would be. This makes a functional, and pretty, leg, but suitable tree limbs are hard to find. A square cross-section leg with a joint at the knee is much easier to construct. Anything less than two by two inches will be too weak to stand up to steady use. Round the edges slightly so kicking the leg is easier on the feet.

The section of the leg extending through the wing chun wooden dummy must be cut with a square cross-section, to eliminate any rotation of the leg in its hole.

The leg leaves the dummy at a point roughly sixteen or seventeen inches from the base of the body. Because the angle of the leg can vary the hole may be raised or lowered as needed. The bottom of the leg should line up with the bottom of the body, about six inches above the floor.

Stress points are at the knee and where the leg passes into the wooden dummy.

Use a strong hardwood, since the leg must withstand a great deal of kicking force. And, as with the arms, it’s a good idea to have a spare leg on hand.


Wooden Dummy Cross Pieces

The dummy is suspended above the ground by two crosspieces or slats, each one inch wide by two inches high.

No matter what wood is used for the rest of the wooden dummy, these crosspieces must be a strong hardwood since they receive most of the force given to the dummy. On the other hand they must not be too brittle, otherwise they will crack rather than flex under stress. Stress points are at the spot where the slats first pass into the dummy. It’s a good idea to have an extra set of crosspieces on hand for the inevitable day when one cracks.

The crosspieces should be no less than five feet long, so they are long enough to flex when the dummy is moved forward or backward, and long enough to extend out several inches on either side of the framework.

The top crosspiece is six inches down from the top of the dummy, the bottom crosspiece is nine inches up from the bottom of the dummy. At this distance apart they provide support so the dummy does not tip forward or backward when moved. Also, if the top crosspiece is any closer to the top of the wooden dummy it gets in the way of a neck-pull.

The crosspieces must be cut perfectly parallel to each other, the top directly over the bottom, otherwise they will bind, and not slide, in the supporting framework. They should also pass directly through the center of the wooden dummy for best balance.

Attach stops so the dummy body won’t slide on the crosspieces – the body and slats should move together. Put another set of stops on the crosspieces to keep the dummy from sliding all the way out of the framework on either side.


Wooden Dummy Frame

Mount your wing chun wooden dummy on two sturdy parallel upright wooden posts (four by eight is a good size) about five feet apart, or on any framework that adequately supports the weight of the dummy while allowing for its movement.

Attach these supports securely to floor, walls, or ceiling. Set them far enough out from anything behind to allow for forward and backward movement of the dummy.

“Life” in the dummy is provided in two ways: by flex in the cross slats when you move the dummy forward or backward, and by these slats sliding in the framework when you move the dummy side to side. Although the dummy should be suspended about six inches above the floor, the actual height of the dummy from the floor depends on your own height: the upper arms point at your shoulders.

You can make the dummy portable by cutting downward pointing L-shaped slots in the uprights to hold the crosspieces. You can then lift the dummy in or out of the top of the slot and then drop it into the bottom of the upside-down “L” to keep it in place. These slots also provide a way to adjust the height of the wooden dummy. Cut the bottom of the slots at the lowest height needed for the dummy then, to raise the dummy, insert wooden risers in each slot. You can also support the crosspieces on L-shaped brackets attached to the front of the uprights.
Wooden Dummy Finish

You don’t need to use oil or stain to finish the wooden dummy, natural oils from the hands and arms will eventually seal and color the wood. I personally use a all natural lin seed wax to finish my dummies. Never kick the arms, as shoes can damage the finish and scratch the wood. Remember, the trunk is for striking and the arms are for flowing around.

Originally Created by Dan Lucas and modified by WCO

http://www.wingchunonline.com/Wingchun/ ... Man_01.pdf

http://www.wingchunonline.com/Wingchun/ ... Man_02.pdf

http://www.wingchunonline.com/wooden-dummy/




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjqL9MdLj0k




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTXA5snEYa8

THANK YOU

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
YOUR BELIEFS WILL IMPRISON YOU.


What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
WHO AM I ? . . . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT ALL IS !!!


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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by khiwarrior » September 6th, 2009, 1:10 pm

nice (Yey!) (Yey!) :yey2 :yey2


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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » September 8th, 2009, 9:53 am

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G'day Kwiwarrior. :wave (TH)

I've got a bit more to add, so keep checking back. (W) :D

Here's a little about the Bart Jam Dao, commonly known as Butterfly Swords ...


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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ke06luhv_nU


About Wing Chun Bat Jum Dao
(Eight Slashing/Piercing Sword-Set)
by Danny Yinsheng Xuan


Wing Chun uses two types of weapons in its system. One is called the Luk Dim Boon Goon, or the Six and a Half Pole-Set in English. The other weapon is the Bat Jum Dao, or the Eight Slashing Sword-Set, in English. Although a misnomer, the swords are often referred to as Butterfly or Broad Swords in English.

The pole length is between 9 to 12 feet, depending on the user's stature. The swords' length also varies, depending on the user's arm length.

About the Name of the Swords

Among the Chinese Wing Chun community, the Wing Chun swords are never referred to as butterfly swords or broadswords. The reference may have come from Western spectators or reporters who did not know the name of the swords or form. They may have referenced it with other twin sword styles that propel their light blades like butterfly wings; or may have coined it in close proximity with butterfly hand knives. To my knowledge, Wing Chun's Bat Jum Dao was never referred to as butterfly swords in Chinese, and has only become associated with them in the English language.

As for the Bat Jum Dao being referred to as broadswords, it is once again an English misnomer. In Chinese, the broadsword is a long sword, whose blade is narrow at the guard, but broadens widely at the belly front.

Translated, Bat Jum Dao literally means "Eight Cutting Swords." However, in Chinese verbiage it means more than that. Bat (sometimes spelled Bot, Baat, Bart or Bard) clearly means Eight. Jum (sometimes spelled Jaam, Jarm, Cham, Charm, Chaam, or Chum) refers to any knife or sword wielding action such as cutting, slashing, chopping, thrusting, stabbing, and etc. Dao, (sometimes spelled Do or Dou) in this case refers to swordplay, swordset, or sword form. Therefore, I've translated Bat Jum Dao as Eight Slashing/Piercing Sword-Set.

About the Types of Bat Jum Dao

Chinese swordsmen often wielded two swords. However, twin short swords, or long daggers were uncommon. They were more prominent in southern China, where close-range fighting was more practical and popular. Hung Gar style, another southern fighting style, also uses a pair of short-swords, which the stylists call Mother-and-Son swords. Since the usage is quite different from Wing Chun's style, the swords are shaped and balanced differently. Most of the short twin swords sold online and in the market are either Mother-and-Son swords, or fake ones claiming to be either Wing Chun or Hung Gar swords.

There are two or three types of Wing Chun Bat Jum Daos. I say two OR three because one is really obsolete and non-applicable for the Wing Chun system.

Because of the transitions Wing Chun went through in different generations, different shape swords were used by different practitioners. (Read Sifu Benny Meng's article on BJDs at http://home.vtmuseum.org/articles/meng/ ... knives.php.) [posted below]


Pre-Wing Chun Era Swords

The first type, which I consider obsolete and non-applicable for Wing Chun, was used in the early days before the development of Wing Chun, or pre-Wing-Chun days. Remember that the roots of all Chinese martial arts came from the monasteries. The monks experimented and used many types of weapons, particularly household and farm tools. The first twin short-swords were probably kitchen or farm knives, which the monks used to defend themselves. They probably made some changes to them to avoid killing the bandits or invaders they encountered. They used them to disarm, disable or maim them; but not to kill them. Since the intend was not to kill, they probably used them for slashing arms and legs instead of stabbing or chopping bodies; therefore, the blades were most likely semi-sharp or sharp at the belly only; the tip was not sharply pointed; and the handle was not aligned to the tip of the blade.

This is the type commonly and erroneously sold and used by the shops and Wing Chun practitioners these days.

Red Boat Era Swords

Bat Jum Dao really came into being in the era of the Red Boat Traveling Opera team or the Righteous Red Flower insurgents, where the swords merged into the Wing Chun system for real battles against the Manchurian soldiers. Because of Wing Chun's aggressive forward (versus lateral and retreating) movements, the blades were shaped like daggers (the handles were aligned to the blade tips) to facilitate stabbing. However, unlike a true dagger, where the blade is shaped symmetrically on both sides (back and edge), the BJD blades were asymmetrical. The back of the blade sloped to the blade tip, but the sharp-edge side followed a straighter path and bellied up to the tip. Thus, the wider blade spine weighed the blade down to facilitate chopping action, and the belly shape facilitated slashing action. The complete design balanced the swords for practical stabbing, chopping and slashing actions for Wing Chun practitioners.

Modern Era Swords

After the warring years, when firearms became more prominent, Wing Chun became more of a self-defense art for individual than for "martial" purposes. Practitioners spent more time training and learning, as we now do today, than using it in the streets. Consequently, sharp, pointed, and lethal swords were not necessary anymore. In fact, the dagger-shaped BJDs were dangerous and accident prone. Thus, the BJDs were reshaped for training rather than warring. This was probably in the era of Leung Jan or Yip Man. The swords reverted to a flat and straight back; the handle was aligned with the blade back and point. The edge was almost parallel to the back line, but took on a slight incline to about 3 inches from the blade point, where it bellied up. The swords became either blunt or semi-sharp. The shape change took away some (not all) of the stabbing functions, and stress more towards chopping and slicing. On the other hand, the dagger-shape blade, even if the edge was blunt, would cause sever damage if thrusted into a body, since the blade point is so acute. By rounding the blade point, the depth of its entry into a body is limited.

Last Thoughts

Although the modern BJD blade shape reverted to almost the Shaolin days, the new BJD had some significant differences. First of all, the handle is aligned with the blade back and point. This gives the user more control over chopping, slicing, and even stabbing. The force from the user's hand, in this case, is directly in line with the blade point for thrusting. The hand is also above the blade (no blade above it), to give weight to the bottom, to give force to chopping action. The slight incline of the edge towards the blade, and the bellying in the front, facilitates slicing action.

Both BJDs, warring and peaceful era, were capable of thrusting, chopping and slicing; however, the functional priorities were different. The functional priorities determined the design; i.e. the alignment of the handle with the blade, the shape of the blade, and the specifications of the guards. The dagger-shape BJDs in the warring era leaned more towards stabbing, followed by chopping, and then slicing. On the other hand, the flat-back curve-front blade shape in the peaceful era leaned more towards slicing, followed by chopping, then stabbing. These two designs, I would say, are true Bat Jum Dao designs. The other designs do not fit the specs of BJD or the concept of Wing Chun.

It is a shame that Bat Jum Daos in the market are so ugly. They look like meat cleavers or wood choppers. There is absolutely no pride in the making of these swords. Bat Jum Dao is a symbol of achievement. It is the graduation trophy for a Wing Chun student. Many Wing Chun schools use the Bat Jum Dao as their icon in their certificates and logos. So, shouldn't you own the best pair of Bat Jum Daos to symbolize your achievement and respect for this magnificent ancient art? WCATS produces top quality, authentic Wing Chun Bat Jum Daos.

http://www.wcarchive.com/articles/danny ... -about.htm



Unraveling the history of Wing Chun's Butterfly Swords
By Benny Meng and Richard Loewenhagen


Wing Chun Kung Fu has become one of the most widely practiced martial arts of the 20th century, yet its history remained aloof and shrouded amidst myths until a courageous and unselfish teacher recently stepped forward and shared serious historical knowledge with the Ving Tsun Museum and, ultimately, the Wing Chun world. Since 1993, the Ving Tsun Museum in Dayton, Ohio has aggressively pursued leads around the globe in an all-out effort to help the Wing Chun community identify its true roots and origins. Recent publications and press releases from the Museum have revealed one of the most promising links to date to the actual origins of the art -- Master Garret Gee and other members of the Hung Gun Bui family practicing Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Kuen.

Fabled stories of a woman named Yim Ving Tsun exist in virtually every Wing Chun family. Books and even movies have popularized the myth that the art originated with her defeat of a local bully in Fatshan, China. In truth, Wing Chun’s history is much more complex and far reaching than this simple myth can convey. This article will reveal the developmental history of Wing Chun's unique swords as taught by one of its original founders, Cheung Ng (Tan Sao Ng), and remove some of the myths that have previously pervaded any study of their origin. In Wing Chun, learning the Butterfly Swords is considered to be a highly advanced stage of learning that represents completing the system. In many cases, only a few students are ever taught the sword level of Wing Chun because it requires advanced comprehension of the nature of the art itself and how the sword is woven into every aspect of the system. Consequently, knowledge of the sword is considered very sacred and oftentimes protected secretively.

Although there are those who perform and practice the Wing Chun Swords today, very few people are familiar with the history and background of their origination. Before examining these origins, it is essential to validate the background and credentials of our information source -- Master Garret Gee (Chu King-Hun). Master Gee comes from a family line renowned for intellectual leadership, statesmanship, and excellence in martial arts and military matters. One prominent ancestor was Zhu Xi, a political leader and teacher in the Song Dynasty. Zhu Xi is credited as being one of the key figures in the revival of Confucianism through the establishment of academic institutions, active correspondence with fellow scholars, publication of over 90 books, and extensive instruction of personal disciples. An imperial decree issued decades after his death designated several of his published commentaries as required reading for all government students. During the Ming Dynasty, Zhu Xi was officially elevated to the stature of Confucius and his birth was celebrated twice yearly.

In more recent history, Master Gee’s grandfather, Chu Jun-Bak, achieved prominence as a military leader and master instructor at the prestigious Wong Bo Military Academy. The Wong Bo Academy is the foremost military school in China with a reputation and distinction that makes it China’s equivalent to the West Point Military Academy in the United States. China’s greatest generals have traditionally been schooled at Wong Bo Academy.

Master Gee, himself, displayed significant martial arts talent at a very early age. He began training under the tutelage of his father at the age of 5. He quickly demonstrated a profound affinity and talent for swordsmanship, as well as other Kung Fu weapons. By the time he was 13 years old he so impressed Dr. Wang Ming (one of the descendents of Cheung Ng and a teacher of Wing Chun from the Hung Fa Yi Secret Society) that he became the last of Dr. Ming’s four disciples.

The evolution of the Wing Chun Butterfly Sword we use today progressed through three primary stages of development. The first stage was its creation as a defensive, non-killing weapon created by the Shaolin monks.

Originally, the butterfly sword was very different from the Wing Chun sword we see today. The butterfly sword was designed to meet the training and defense needs of Shaolin monks. In harmony with Buddhist philosophy and teachings, the monks designed the weapon for parrying, disarming, and cutting -- not for killing. Consequently, the blade was structured with dull edges on top and bottom to be used for interception of an opponent’s weapons. As indicated in the attached drawing, only the first 3 inches (the curved part) of the blade were sharpened. The remainder of the blade, top and bottom, was solid and dull for parrying and non-lethal striking purposes. The monks created the dull blade on the butterfly sword not only because it was a weapon of self-defense, but also because the dull blade added thickness for extra support to the structure of the sword. Having a sharpened blade on the butterfly sword was useful for chopping but because of the thin edge of the sword, the blade could easily be damaged or broken when defending against a longer, heavier weapon in combat. For this reason, the Shaolin monks preferred the sturdier blade. Today's Wing Chun sword techniques still emphasize parrying, obstructing, or intercepting an opponent's weapon. These remain highly consistent with the original design and intent of the blade itself.

In the Shaolin Temple, the butterfly sword was not mass-produced to a specific length. Rather, the length of each butterfly sword was customized to the practitioner. Specifically, the blade measured from the practitioner’s wrist to his or her elbow. The monks heavily stressed the need to tailor the butterfly sword to its intended practitioner. An unfitted blade, used as intended, could easily harm the user and limit the mobility of his arms and body. In contrast, the width of the blade did not vary. It remained 3 inches from top to bottom starting at the hilt and extending to the start of the blade curvature near the tip. The 3-inch width was selected because it approximates the width of a developed male wrist. The thickness of the blade varied, dependent upon the sword maker, but was usually about 1/8th of an inch throughout. The handle of the sword sported a guard in the shape of a hook with an open end. The monks used this guard to trap an opponent’s weapon and quickly disarm them. Again, this was consistent with Buddhist philosophy -- disarm an enemy rather than kill him. All in all, the Shaolin Butterfly Sword was considered a small weapon in contrast to its counterparts. This was intentional as the monks wished to conceal the sword beneath their robes while traveling. They could move about in public without being questioned or creating an improper image in respect to their Buddhist teachings. As noted above, the original Shaolin usage of the blades was deeply rooted in Buddhist beliefs. Killing was not an option. Both the blade and the training methods for using it centered around parrying, disarming, and cutting. It was considered far more humane to surgically cut tendons at the joints, thereby maiming an opponent rather than killing him.

The change in shape and intended function of the swords was a direct result of the creation of the Wing Chun fighting system with the specific intent of training revolutionaries to engage the imperial troops of the Ching Dynasty. According to Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Kuen, the Double Butterfly Swords form seen in Shaolin Kung Fu was first created by the Fut Pai Hung Mun (Buddhist Hung Mun). The Fut Pai Hung Mun was a secret society existing within the Southern Shaolin Temple itself. This society’s primary goal was to oppose the Ching Dynasty that arose from the Manchurian conquest of China in the 17th century, and to restore the Ming family to the throne. They needed an art that was efficient to train and employ. They needed an art that was complete in that it consistently developed empty hand skills along with both long and short, as well as single to double, weaponry.

Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun tradition further instructs that two Shaolin Wing Chun masters survived the Manchurian massacre at the Southern Shaolin Temple. They are credited with keeping the Wing Chun system alive. The senior of the two masters was Yat Chum Dai Si, a 22nd generation Shaolin Grand Master. The second was Cheung Ng (Tan Sao Ng). Very little information remains today of the ensuing history of Yat Chum Dai Si. Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun tradition holds that he was originally trained in and belonged to the Northern Shaolin Temple at Shong Shon. He later moved to the Southern Temple as part of the joint effort to secretly develop the Wing Chun style of fighting during the effort to train rebels for restoring the Ming Dynasty to power. It was there that he met Cheung Ng.

Cheung Ng was reported to be a highly educated man with an extensive background in both literary and military skills. He often performed in dramatic opera. It is believed that he was originally a native of Hanbuck and that his family had served the Ming regime for generations as military tacticians and warriors. The Manchurians destroyed his family and Cheung Ng fled to the Northern Shaolin Temple seeking refuge. He was accepted as a Shaolin disciple and trained at the temple. It was there that he learned of Yat Chum Dai Si’s activities at the Southern Temple and the gatherings in a place called Hung Fa Ting where training and planning for the restoration of the Ming Dynasty took place. He then left the Northern Temple to join the rebels in the Southern Temple. Under Yat Chum Dai Si he began his studies of the art that was to become Wing Chun.

Following the destruction of the Southern Shaolin Temple in the mid-seventeenth century, Cheung Ng is believed to have fled to Guangdong Province. The city of Fatshan is widely accredited with being the birthplace of Wing Chun. Historically, it is important to note that Fatshan is in Guangdong Province. It is also historically interesting to note that Fatshan is also credited to be the birthplace of the Red Boat Opera Company. Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun tradition holds that Cheung Ng formed the Red Boat Opera Company as a means of disguising rebel activity and supporting his teaching of Wing Chun Kung Fu to rebel leaders. The Red Boat Company was noted for its discipline and rules of conduct. With its talented performers and tight discipline, coupled with the logistic advantages of traveling up and down China’s rivers at will, it is logical to assert that the Red Boat Opera Company was capable of promoting covert training and instruction of rebel warriors throughout Southern China in the art of Wing Chun.

These historical events lead us to the second stage of evolution of the traditional Shaolin butterfly sword into today’s Bot Jom Doa. This stage was greatly influenced by the fighting needs of the Secret Society of Hung Fa Wui (the Red Flower Society) and the Hung Gun Bui family. With the passing of time, revolutionary fighting against the Manchurians and the Ching Dynasty increased in intensity and the blade began its transition from a defensive oriented parrying weapon to an offensive weapon designed to kill. To make the blade more suitable to warfare, the revolutionary secret society members of the Hung Fa Wui sought to make it more lethal.

According to Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Kuen tradition, Cheung Ng, himself, modified the traditional butterfly sword to create a practical battlefield weapon. Although the changes he made initially were subtle, when combined with the latest, foremost fighting system of Wing Chun as the foundation, the results were very lethal. This new version of the butterfly sword represented a new stage of development for the weapon and its use, but the knowledge of the modifications and training to use them were never disclosed by Grand Master Tan Sao Ng or the Secret Society to the general public. The modified swords were known to the Secret Society as the Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Double Butterfly Swords.

The Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Swords were very similar to the traditional version. Most of the top and bottom of the blade remained straight. But, the design was altered at the tip to accommodate thrusting and stabbing motions. To this end, they trimmed the front of the blade, adding a curvature and sharpened point that gave the sword the appearance of a large dagger. The notched area was then sharpened and blood grooves were added to the sides of the blade. This enabled blood to drain more easily when the point of the sword pierced the stomach or other organs.

Although the Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Swords are not generally known to the public, the Hung Fa Yi Wing Chun Kuen still practice with them according to the original form and routines taught by Grand Master Tan Sao Ng. Their intent is to preserve the knowledge of the swords’ use and the methods employed by the revolutionaries to train them.

With centuries of interaction among the different styles of Southern China, the Wing Chun Sword continued to evolve. The third phase of evolution of the Shaolin Butterfly Swords into the Wing Chun Sword and Bot Jom Doa training form we know today took place in the 19th century. This modern version of the Butterfly Sword has many variations in shape, but the biggest difference is that all have sharpened the entire length of the blade. Another type of blade also evolved during this modern period. It is called the Tiger's Head Blade. It shares the same characteristic of sharpness throughout its entire length, but it also incorporates a significant curvature or bow toward the front half of the blade.

In summary, there are three primary eras of development of the Butterfly Swords. Out of these eras have come four distinct types of blades heavily influenced by applications relevant to that period. The first blade originated from Shaolin. It consisted of a 3-inch wide blade with only the first 3 inches of the blade sharpened. The next blade originated with the Secret Societies. It consisted of the same 3 inch wide blade with a modified tip to make it more lethal when used for stabbing. The third blade originated in the modern era and is distinguished by sharpening the entire blade. The final blade is the Tiger's Blade with its bowed front.

Oftentimes, advanced practitioners will focus on weapons training by examining technical details of current uses and applications. In contrast, an approach that focuses on the evolution of a weapon can give the practitioner a whole new perspective on use and application. Such is the case with the Wing Chun Butterfly Swords.

http://home.vtmuseum.org/articles/meng/ ... knives.php

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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » January 18th, 2010, 11:33 am

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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

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Re: Wing Chun Kung Fu

Unread post by I AM ALL I AM » January 21st, 2010, 12:32 am

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WHEN PAIRED OPPOSITES DEFINE YOUR BELIEFS,
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What is TRUTH ? . . . .THAT THE ONENESS IS ALL !!!
What is JOY ? . . . . . .ALL THAT THE ONENESS IS !!!
What is LOVE ? . . . . .THE ONENESS THAT IS ALL !!!
What is LIFE ? . . . . . ALL THAT IS THE ONENESS !!!
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